Made

Knitted colour block blanket

Knitting a blanket has been on my wish list of things I want to make for a while now.
My go-to method for making blankets is crochet. There are so many great patterns and so many ideas in my head that I want to explore. But still, the idea of ​​knitting a blanket kept popping up in my head too, especially since I often feel knit fabrics feel so much squichier than crochet fabric, especially with the garter stitch.

You can hardly get any simpler with knitting than this. Needle after needle just regular knit stich and you get a springy, super soft result.
But I admit, in terms of appearance, this can give a pretty boring result. But not if you work with colour blocks! Which is what I did for my little blanket here.

I went for a series of matching, yet contrasting wools from Bergère de France Sport. Each colour block is one full skein of 50 grams.

The hardest part for me were the edges.
This remains a stumbling block in my knitting: getting a nice straight edge. Therefore I followed the technique that Purlsoho used for their colour block blanket. Each first stitch of the row was simply transferred to the other needle, without knitting, with the yarn held at the back. This also created a nice sort of rib stitch along the edge.

This technique worked well for both sides of the blanket, but I did get a kind of jump where I had to start a new skein. This is because you can’t just skip the first stitch when changing yarns. I had hoped that this jump would become a little less visible after washing and blocking, but this didn’t change much. That’s why I hesitated for a while about making a border around the blanket, but in the end I decided against it, mainly because I thought that a border in a solid colour would take away from the nice colour block effect.

All in all, a very fun, simple project, with a beautiful, super soft result, that will keep a little boy nice and warm this winter!

Cheers,
Charlotte

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